| Follow Us:
The New Adventure Park-West Bloomfield
The New Adventure Park-West Bloomfield - David Lewinski Photography | Show Photo

In the News

1617 Articles | Page: | Show All

Four Metro Detroit cities make list of best places to find a job in Michigan

According to Nerdwallet.com, Livonia, Dearborn, Rochester Hills, Royal Oak, and Novi are cities with good job markets where your paycheck actually buys you something! That's not as common as you'd think.

Excerpt:

"...NerdWallet crunched the numbers to find the best places for job seekers in Michigan, and we did so by asking the following questions:

1. Is the city growing?  We assessed growth in the working-age population, ages 16 and older, from 2009 to 2011 to ensure that the city was attracting workers and exhibiting a trend of upward population growth.

2. Can you afford to live in the city comfortably?  We looked at a city’s median household income to see if workers made a good living. We also analyzed the monthly homeowner costs, including mortgage payments, to see if the city had a reasonable cost of living.

3. Are most people employed?  We looked at the unemployment rate."

More here.

U-M Dearborn's eCities study recognizes Sterling Heights for supporting entrepreneurs

U-M Dearborn's iLabs has selected Sterling Heights as one of eight cities statewide that goes above and beyond to foster entrepreneurship.

Excerpt:

“These communities are being recognized for the best practices they utilize, which include the right mix of tools and resources for their business community,” said Tim Davis, director, iLabs. “They listen to companies, help them with governmental processes,  connect  them with other companies and listen to what both new and  existing  businesses are saying. They are the definition of partners in the process and not just a service provider.”

More here.

Superfly Kids finds flyaway success with superhero capes business

What started as a sewing hobby has achieved liftoff for a pair of intrepid entrepreneurs in Livonia.

Excerpt:

"...one Michigan company is moving faster than a speeding bullet — by  selling superhero capes.

Livonia-based Superfly Kids makes and sells capes — custom capes, to be exact — for kids and a few adults. And their sales have taken off like, well, Superman.

From 2010 to this year, the company, owned by Holly Bartman and Justin Draplin, has seen its revenues leap from about $260,000 to an estimated $2.4 million. They are expected to double next year."

More here.

Metro Detroit home prices jump 42% in October

Buyers are willing to put more money where their mouth is when it comes to purchasing a home this year.

Excerpt:

"October marked the eighth straight month that the median selling price in Metro Detroit rose by double digits annually.

According to Realcomp, the Farmington Hills-based Multiple Listing Service for southeast Michigan, the median selling price for homes in Metro Detroit was up 41.9 percent year-over-year last month to $127,000...

Homes sold quicker in October of this year, spending 22 fewer days on the market at 56 days."

More here.

Anthony Bourdain digs Detroit's underground dining scene

From front-yard BBQ to a kitchen in a firefighters' station, Detroit's underground dining scene is being broadcasted to the nation.

Excerpt:

"Detroit-connected Facebooks went abuzz this weekend when chef and television personality Anthony Bourdain  wrote a love letter to Detroit  in anticipation of the season finale of his show "Anthony Boudain: Parts Unknown",  set in Detroit, which aired Sunday night.

In his Tumblr post Bourdain gushed about his trip to Detroit, saying, "I love Detroit. I think it's beautiful. I think it's one  of the most beautiful cities in America—still."   He also said, "I love Detroit. I love Detroiters. You've got to have a sense of  humor to live in a city so relentlessly fucked. You've got to be  tough—and occasionally even devious. And Detroiters are  funny, tough—and supreme improvisers." As such, the episode's narrative focused on the more DIY and under-the-radar dining experiences in the D."

More here.

Michigan growers use new technology to put apples to sleep

After last year's pittance of an apple crop, Michigan apples are an economic sweet spot again.

Excerpt:

"This year's Michigan apple crop is expected to be 10 times as plentiful as last year's puny output.

While the big bounce-back is welcomed in the nation's third-largest apple-producing state, the bounty presents its own challenges: How do growers, packers and processors maximize storage to avoid flooding stores with the fruit, thus crashing the market and lowering growers' profits?...

A fairly recent innovation called 1-methylcyclopropene, or 1-MCP, temporarily stops apples' ability to respond to their own cues for ripening...

Known commercially as "SmartFresh," it "has been a game-changer for apple storage and is partly responsible for the up-trending consumption of apples in the U.S. over the last 5 to 10 years," Michigan State University horticulture professor Randy Beaudry said. He is involved in updating a traditional apple refrigeration method known as "controlled-atmosphere storage," or "CA," to double the time Honeycrisp apples can be stored.

In a typical year, Michigan's 9.2 million trees produce 20 million to 23 million bushels, pumping up to $900 million into the economy...The state distributes to 26 states and 18 countries."

More here.

New skate ramp to become art exhibit at Cranbrook Art Museum

You've got until Nov. 12 to go make your mark on the new ramp at Modern Skate Park in Royal Oak before it becomes an art exhibit at Cranbrook. If you're not a skater, you can still come check out this 25-foot-long art installation. 

Excerpt:

"Cranbrook Art Museum just completed the installation of a new half-pipe skate ramp at Modern State Park in Royal Oak. Skaters are encouraged to use the ramp over the next few weeks and leave their mark, then the surface will be peeled away and it will become part of the Museum’s new exhibition,  My Brain Is in My Inkstand: Drawing as Thinking and Process, which opens on  November 16.

The exhibition examines the work of 22 artists from around the world as they show how the act of drawing impacts both artistic and scientific thinking. This project is directed by Chemi Rosado-Seijo, an artist whose  History on Wheels  project is an ongoing exploration of the correlation between skateboarding and artistic practice."

Watch the video to see the ramp in action. And for more info, click here.



Michigan's cider mills make national hit list of fall travel getaways

Rochester's historic Yates Cider Mill has cropped up on a list of autumn trips to make around the nation.

Excerpt:

"For a farm-style adventure that's full of flavor, make Michigan's cider mills part of your travel itinerary. There are more than 100 of them in the state, many of which offer free admission. Prices per tasting and bushel vary, but a family of four can typically enjoy an afternoon at one of the mills for less than 50 bucks. One popular example is Yates Cider Mill. A working water-powered cider producer since 1863, it is an authentic piece of American agricultural heritage that's bursting with home-spun fun."

More here.

Beaumont Hospital receives $5 million gift for natural birthing center

Expecting mothers who'd like to go the natural childbirthing route at Beaumont will have a new support system once they reach the hospital.

Excerpt:

"Danialle and Peter Karmanos  Jr. are giving $5 million to Beaumont Health System  in suburban Detroit to expand natural birthing options for expectant  mothers...

The Karmanos Center for Natural Birth is expected to open in late 2014. It will combine the comfort of a home-like environment with the safety net of a hospital. The center will include birthing suites, a walking path for expectant mothers and a rooftop  garden."

More here.

Dickinson Wright is tops in U.S. News' "Best Law Firms" 2014 report

The legal eagles at Detroit-based Dickinson Wright PLLC have taken top national and regional awards in a litany of specialties, according to the 2014 rankings in U.S. News. The firm says it has garnered 92 first-tier rankings out of 70 practice areas overall. Within Michigan, it earned first-tier recognition in 67 practice areas.

See the rankings here.


Big Bang Detroit production company gets shout-out from NY Times

A Detroit and Clawson-based producer is getting national notice for its coverage of entrepreneurs around the country. Along with the cofounders of Priceline.com and Angie's List, Detroit's McClure's Pickles has been featured on this nationally-televised show.

Excerpt:

"Gary Bredow has always been curious about how the businesses he patronizes started, whether it’s a local bakery, a pizza place or a hardware store. "I always wondered about how they got their inventory, how they leased the store or where they got the idea in the first place," Mr. Bredow said.

He gets his answers, and more, in "Start Up," a new television "docu-series" he created for PBS that, in its first season, tells the stories of entrepreneurs in eight cities across the United States. Mr. Bredow hosts the series, which was directed by Per Franchell, Mr. Bredow’s partner in a production company,  Big Bang Detroit."

More here.

GM makes headway in Consumer Reports' quality rankings

After decades of losing sales to Japanese automakers, now GM is increasingly making it worth buyers' while.

Excerpt:

"Consumer Reports  pulled its recommendation for Toyota Motor Corp.’s Camry sedan and said post-bankruptcy  General Motors  Co. is among the automakers cracking Japanese brands’ dominance in fielding reliable  cars...

Consumer Reports last month awarded the new Chevrolet Silverado with the highest rating among all pickups after giving the Chevy Impala the best marks among all sedans in  July.

"Post-bankruptcy GM has just gotten its stuff together," said Fisher, a former development engineer at the Detroit-based automaker who worked mostly on theCadillac  and Saturn brands. "The vehicles that have been produced and designed” after bankruptcy have shown "marked change in terms of  performance."

More here.

Detroit talks transit, local food at Initiative for a Competitive Inner City

It was evident, after last week's Initiative for a Competitive Inner City conference in Cleveland last week that Detroit's wheels are turning on mass transit and urban ag, among other things.

Excerpt:

"If Detroiters wish to know what benefits may come from the new M1 light rail line that will soon start construction on Woodward Avenue, they need look no further than Cleveland.

Cleveland’s HealthLine, a bus rapid transit system that connects downtown Cleveland with the hospitals and universities in the University Circle district four miles to the east, is celebrating its fifth anniversary. And in those five years, ridership has soared 60% from the first year and development along the route has boosted property values more than 300%...

A lot of the discussion at the two-day ICIC summit centered on local food economies and the promise they hold for new jobs in cities like Detroit...

Right now, Carmody said, most people get only about 3% of their food from local sources, and the rest comes from distant locales like Mexico or California. If that increased to 20%, he estimated it would create 5,000 jobs and $125 million in new household income for Detroiters."

More here.

Moving Our Metro event explores pace of transit to come

Save the Date: The public is invited to the Michigan Suburbs Alliance annual meeting and Transportation Mini-Conference on Monday, Nov. 18 at the Adoba Hotel Dearborn.

Excerpt:

"Spend a day learning tactics and tools you can use to shape a greater Detroit though transportation funding and planning. We're bringing in experts on scenario planning, MAP-21, performance metrics and cargo-oriented development to help us work together toward a better transportation future for metro Detroit.  With several sessions to choose from, you can tailor your experience to meet your interests and needs."

Click here for more details.

How Utah turned an unpopular transit system into a hit

How does a regional transit system go from angry protests and scorn to citizen's taxing themselves $2.5 billion to complete construction faster in just 10 years? With all the rancor aimed at developing local transit options, maybe there's something to be learned from Salt Lake City's build it and they will love it approach.
 
Excerpt:
 
"Oddly enough, one of UTA's most effective strategies for uniting people was targeting those who don't use public transit. The agency and its advocates pointed out that TRAX ridership saves 29,000 trips — or two full freeway lanes — in the Interstate-15 corridor every day. Road-reliant businesses like UPS ran ads explaining that FrontLines would help residents get their packages quicker by reducing traffic.
 
UTA also worked hard to create what Meyer calls an "inter-local agreement" among cities up and down the Salt Lake Valley corridor. Transit officials explained the basic infrastructure that would be put in place in every city and told local officials that they would have to pay for any extra amenities themselves. That early clarity prevented cities from withholding support unless they got a better deal than others."
 
Read the rest here.
1617 Articles | Page: | Show All
Share this page
0
Email
Print
Signup for Email Alerts