| Follow Us:

Detroit : In the News

394 Detroit Articles | Page: | Show All

National Main Streets conference & events land in Detroit, Ferndale this weekend

Detroit and area downtowns are serving as the backdrop for 1,200 of the nation's leading downtown revitalization experts, who are convening in downtown Detroit and Ferndale starting this weekend.

Excerpt:

"The Detroit suburb of Ferndale is among Michigan communities where downtown revitalization efforts are considered successful. Work has turned West Nine Mile from a bleak, dusty four-lane road into a walkable commercial strip with most storefronts filled...

"There's so much enthusiasm," said Patrice Frey, the Main Street Center's president and CEO. "After I visited Detroit last May, I told my husband, 'There's a really cool energy in Detroit. It feels like the next big thing.'"

More here.

HGTV's 'House Hunters' show comes to Detroit

Check out this episode of House Hunters, where the search for a Midtown Detroit home is on.

Excerpt:

"Young first-time buyers, Dan and Rachel, are hoping to find the ultimate deal in the hip Detroit neighborhood of Ferndale. But the seemingly inexpensive, five-figure deals are a wake-up call for these 20-somethings when they encounter the realities of the turbulent Motown real estate market."

More here

The Atlantic Cities calls for bus rapid transit all the way downtown

With mass transit finally going places in Detroit, The Atlantic Cities makes its case for dedicated bus lane network through city downtowns. 

Excerpt:

"One of the reasons so-called  Bus-Rapid Transit projects have been  so  contentious  in U.S. cities is that urban street space is a precious commodity. Unwilling to give BRT  exclusive lanes  along the median, many cities route the buses into curbside lanes with mixed traffic. There, BRT must share the curb with turning cars, double-parked trucks, and other traffic conflicts — forcing the buses initially sold to the public as "speedy" to a crawl.

In other words, what feels like a compromise is really a critical error. American cities that fail to extend true BRT through the downtown area ensure that the systems receive their greatest visibility in places where they experience their lowest effectiveness. The result can be to sour public opinion on BRT at large, making subsequent expansions —  there or elsewhere around the country  — all the more difficult."

More here.

Detroit-based Door Stops designers get national attention for "public furniture"

While "public art" has made it into the everyday lexicon, how about "public furniture?" 

Excerpt:

"Made from old doors salvaged from destroyed properties, the shelters are colorfully painted to put a smile on the faces of folks in the vicinity. (Not that you could tell it from the above photo – maybe the bus is running late?) The first of the stops went out into the city  late last year; today, the A' Design Award & Competition announced that it is gifting the effort with a silver medal in "Social Design."

More here.

Detroit is one of nation's top 7 most underrated food cities

There's no better way to make the foodie radar list than having "underrated" next to your name.

Excerpt:

"Being in Detroit puts you in ridiculously close proximity to some of the most authentic, best-tasting food you'd normally need a passport to enjoy. With the proper research/guidance, it's totally possible to travel the culinary world in 20mi, leaving you with a TON of leftover cash to blow on the important things... like even more food."

More here.

Atlantic Cities catches wind of Detroit Drone's new technology

Much more than a fly-by-night operation, Detroit Drone has some neat new technology that could become a powerful force in public service.

Excerpt:

"When government officials in Detroit gathered to celebrate the demolition of the  Brewster-Douglass housing projects  downtown last week, they were joined by a few drones.

One belonged to Harry Arnold, a local drone enthusiast who's turned his long-held interests in videography and radio-controlled helicopters  into a marketable service  (he runs the company Detroit Drone now)....

He wants drones to become part of the typical fire-fighting experience, capturing images humans can't get near and providing ground commanders an aerial view they otherwise wouldn't have. Just last week, Arnold was invited out to  film a hazmat training session  in the city, showing response crews what it would be like to have an extra layer of technology in the case of something like a chemical fire.

Arnold is optimistic his vision will become reality soon. "It's a technology that can have a public service," he says. "It has a chance to save lives."

More here.


Detroit-filmed movie, "Misled," to premiere at Florida film festival

A new Metro Detroit-made flick will be under the marquee lights at a Florida film fest this weekend.

Excerpt:

"Misled" is to screen Saturday at the Gasparilla International Film Festival in Tampa.

"Misled" is the debut feature of Detroit-based film company J Squared Productions.

The movie stars Detroit native Jonathan Stanley, who also is its co-writer and producer. It's a story about growing up on the streets of Detroit, based largely on Stanley's life, including him dropping out of high school and working as a stripper.

More here.

Detroit ranks no. 15 on national list of apartment boom towns

If you're looking to rent or build a rental property in Detroit, the gold rush is on. 

Excerpt:

"The conditions are right for rental housing in general and apartments in particular to remain popular for a while, said housing expert John McIlwain, senior resident fellow at the  Urban Land Institute, a nonprofit land-use research and education group.

“Housing prices are going to go up, and credit remains tight,” he said.

At the same time, unemployment remains relatively high for people in their 20s and 30s, and many of them are burdened with student debt, McIlwain added. So, many people are delaying buying homes. Meanwhile, construction costs are rising.

“The big challenge to industry is to provide rental housing at prices that middle-income people can afford,” he said.

That’s why, when we wanted to determine America’s Top 15 Apartment Boom Towns, we included a measure of affordability. We also looked at indicators of apartment availability, economic growth and population growth for the 100 most populated metro areas in the U.S.; the data covered 2009 to 2013, depending on the category."

More here.

Wallet Hub says Detroit is tops in nation for home-buying power & industrial variety

Detroit ranked 38th best out of America's 60 largest cities to find a job, beating out heavies like Chicago and New York. While there's plenty of room to keep powering up the job prospects, Detroit took the top spots in the categories of annual home-buying power and most industrial variety. 

Excerpt:

"More than 100 million people have moved within the past five years, according to data from the U.S. Census Bureau, and 48% of unemployed individuals have picked up their roots in search of a job over that timeframe.   This societal mobility stands to be a major asset for job seekers as the economy improves.   In fact, 2014 is expected to be a strong year for hiring, with 27% of employers planning to hire, according to the  National Association for Business Economics, and a projected 8% bump in the number of recent college graduates who land jobs, per the  National Association for Colleges and Employers."

More here.

Detroit's John K. King Used and Rare Books one of world's best bookstores

Its million-plus selection of books is enough to fill a factory, which Detroit's John K. King Books does. The choices are voluminous enough to land it on Business Insider's list of the world'd best bookstores.

Excerpt:

"Cardboard signs, musty paperback aromas, and a hand-scrawled map out of a Wes Anderson panic attack are your only tour guides as you lose track of time and the person you came with," writes Megan Cytron  at Trazzler.

More here

Nominations Open for 2014 Regional Transit Awards

From now through February 28, the public has a voice in the shape of mass transit to come. Transportation Riders United is seeking award nominations for area individuals who have been dedicated to making southeast Michigan's regional transit system a reality.

Award categories include:
Transit Employee of the Year
Corporate Transit Champion Award
Exemplary Innovation Award
Under 30 Breakthrough Transit Champion
Unsung Hero Award
Forward Motion Award for Most Effective Public Service

Make your nominations here until February 28.

Detroit public transit: What fantasy looks like

Check out what visionaries over at Wired magazine think Detroit's transit system oughtta be.

See the map here.

Detroit home purchase strikes national chord

A must-read story (it's gotten over 1 million views) from a 20-something who buys and fixes up a shell of a home in Detroit, and in the process builds something much bigger.

Excerpt:

"I wanted something nobody wanted, something that was impossible. The city is filled with these structures, houses whose yellowy eyes seem to follow you. It would be only one house out of thousands, but I wanted to prove it could be done, prove that this American vision of torment could be built back into a home...

“Just looking at it, it’s a lot of work,” the neighbor across the street said, figuring I would give up after a month or two. There were no doors or windows, plumbing or electricity, nothing. There was a pornographic hole in the roof..."

More here.

M-1 Rail to start construction this year, seeks bids from local contractors

Work on the M-1 Rail starts rolling this year, but first off: the bid process.

Excerpt:

"Detroit's $137 million, 3.3-mile M-1 Rail streetcar project along Woodward is seeking proposals from local contractors and suppliers as it aims to start construction this year...

"The release of the bid packages is another important step forward for this project," said Paul Childs, M-1 Rail chief operating officer.

"Our construction manager has indicated the streetcar project has generated significant interest from the local contractor and supplier community, so they’re expecting to receive a very strong response to their requests for proposal."

Childs said M-1 expects to get 5,000 riders a day, about 1.8 million annually, when it starts service in 2016."

More here.

Immigrants seen as way to shore up Detroit economy

Detroit may once again become the go-to city for highly-skilled immigrants.

Excerpt:

"For Detroit, a city that has watched a population in free fall, officials have a new antidote: immigrants.

Gov. Rick Snyder of Michigan on Thursday announced plans to seek federal help in bringing 50,000 immigrants to the bankrupt city over five years as part of a visa program aimed at those with advanced degrees or exceptional abilities in science, business or the arts...

Mr. Snyder said demand already exists for experts in fields like engineering, technology and health care. And he noted that Michigan colleges and universities are home to tens of thousands of international students — many of whom, he said, ought not depart after graduation."

More here.
394 Detroit Articles | Page: | Show All
Share this page
0
Email
Print
Signup for Email Alerts