| Follow Us:

Detroit : In the News

394 Detroit Articles | Page: | Show All

"Homecoming" event spotlights Detroit's economic progress to the nation

Detroit showed itself off to advantage at a recent event attended by the nation's movers and shakers.

Excerpt:

"In May, J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. said the bank would invest $100 million over the next five years in the city. Other companies, foundations and the state of Michigan pledged more than $800 million over 20 years to help protect the city-owned Detroit Institute of Arts from possible sale...

Residential vacancy in the city's downtown and midtown neighborhoods is low as office space has begun to fill up, driven in large measure by dozens of buildings acquired and renovated by Quicken Loans founder Dan Gilbert. As part of the event Thursday, premium grocer  Whole Foods  said it was searching for a second location in the city after opening its first store last year.

"It's much better after the bankruptcy than before," investor  Warren Buffett  told an invitation-only crowd.

Last year, the chairman and chief executive of Omaha, Neb.-based  Berkshire Hathaway  said Detroit had huge potential for investors, saying he would be open to buying business in the city. On Thursday, he said in a staged conversation with Mr. Gilbert that he once considered buying the Ambassador Bridge that connects Detroit across its namesake river to Canada and wouldn't rule out future investments in the city."

More here.

Thrillist eats up Detroit's hottest new restaurants

A slew of new restaurants in Detroit and its close-in neighbors makes Thrillist's menu of must-eats.

Excerpt:

"Royal Oak
By contrast, absolutely nothing about DROUGHT -- or its devotees -- will make you think "hot mess". Because, you know, healthy. The newest DROUGHT cold-pressed raw juice retail location has opened in Royal Oak, to be followed by its fifth spot in Birmingham next month...

Ferndale
Boogie Fever, the quintessential nightclub for all Detroit-area phallus-themed bachelorette parties, has closed. Long live Boogie Fever. In its place, the owners have opened Twisted Tavern, a restaurant in front and party in the back (with Twist Night Club). They're billing it as a from-scratch small plates tavern (think polenta fries and pork belly flatbreads), but some questions remain, including: now where will all the cougars coug? And the dudes who try to prey on sad, single bridesmaids, only to end up cougar food? This is a delicate ecosystem!"

More here.
 

"Grain" feature film begins shooting in Detroit

The cameras are zooming in on a very intriguing plot unfolding in Detroit this month.

Excerpt:

"Grain will film in the city of Detroit at various emblematic and historic locations. It was awarded an incentive of $238,588 on $727,406 of projected in-state expenditures and is expected to hire 77 Michigan workers with a full time equivalent of eight jobs.

The film is set in an indefinite near future, where the existence of sustainable life is threatened. Together, a genetics expert and a general chaos scientist join forces in the Dead Lands to find fresh seeds, changing everything they thought they knew in the process."

More here.

Raise your glasses! Pop-up biergarten fundraiser set for Sept. 20 on Belle Isle

On Sat., Sept.  20, the Belle Isle Conservancy  Emerging Patrons Council is creating a pop-up beer garden to raise funds for the installation of bike racks on the island. The beer garden will be located on the grounds of  the White House, the oldest building on the island, built in 1863.

Click here for more details.


 

Detroit Slow Roll co-founder appears in iPad advertisement

Check out the new iPad ad featuring footage of the summer bike rides that have attracted thousands to pedal Detroit streets.

Excerpt:

"Among a series of new story-advertisements for its iPad, Apple is featuring Detroit community activist Jason Hall, who co-founded weekly bike rides that attract thousands of cyclists to the city.

With two videos and some background on Hall at  apple.com/jason, the technology giant notes that Hall "rallies thousands of people to experience the rebirth of Detroit from the ground level."

More here

"Game on, Detroit," says Delta Airlines's Sky magazine

Detroit has landed prime feature coverage in the August issue of Sky, Delta Airlines's in-flight magazine.

Excerpt:

"With Detroit Tigers slugger Miguel Cabrera on the cover, the publication declares, "Game on, Detroit," with a smaller title, "Seizing Opportunity in America's Motor City."

The August issue features interviews with Gov. Rick Snyder and Mayor Mike Duggan, as well as commentary from the Detroit Free Press' Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Stephen Henderson. Delta Air Lines CEO Richard Anderson kicks things off with an editorial titled, "Detroit's Remarkable Turnaround."

More here.

And read the Sky story here.
 

USA Today captures Michigan's natural and manmade beauty

Lighthouses, the Ambassador Bridge, The Henry Ford Museum, and fields of golden daisies are all captured at the height of the summer travel season in this lovely USA Today photo essay.

View it here

New York Times Magazine comes for the ride at underground biker rally

Could Detroit host the next version of the eponymous Sturgis Motorcycle Rally? Custom Harleys, BBQs, even a cowboy showed for a biker rally that's been powering up in Detroit every weekend.

Excerpt:

"Every Sunday for the past decade, people have been gathering in a sparse corner of East Detroit for an ad hoc bike rally and block party that has grown solely through word of mouth. The event grew out of jam sessions held in a small shed called John’s Carpet Shack that featured local blues and jazz musicians including Otis Williams, the last surviving member of the Temptations."

View the photo essay here.

Metro Detroit home prices climb 20% in June

The spring home-buying season proved to be a bountiful one for regional property values as buyer confidence increased.

Excerpt:

"The median selling price in Metro Detroit rose on an annual basis for a 16th straight month in June, according to figures released Monday by Farmington Hills-based Realcomp, the multiple listing service for southeast Michigan and a small portion of northern Ohio.

The median selling price in Metro Detroit climbed 20.2 percent year-over-year to $149,000 in June. Realcomp defines Metro Detroit as Oakland, Wayne, Livingston and Macomb counties."

More here.

Contests become launchpads for Detroit startups

In the last few years, entrepreneurs are increasingly making pitch and business plan competitions part of their game plans. And more than ever, nationally televised contests are filming in Detroit. 

Excerpt:

"A number of competitions mirroring the style of hit TV show "Shark Tank" have sprung up in Detroit,  where a downtown start-up tech scene  has taken root...

Mark Kiel's company, which developed software to interpret data about gene mutations in DNA sequencing, was founded two months ago, but he has already raised $47,000 in capital.Kiel, 37, won his money from MiQuest, the Michigan Collegiate Innovation Prize and Greenlight Best Overall Pitch.

Ann Arbor-based Genomenon has won three business-pitch competitions — allowing Kiel to bypass the traditional route of hitting up family and friends or wooing an angel from a venture capital firm."

More here.

Why Detroit shouldn't build on $500 houses as a renewal strategy

The old adage "If something sounds too good to be true, it is too good to be true," applies when it comes to fantastically low Detroit home prices. Here's a well-reasoned article on why super-cheap home sales shouldn't be ground-floor urban renewal strategies.

Excerpt:

"Perhaps you’ve heard of the mythical  $500Detroit  house. Plagued by years of blight, desolation, and grim economic deterioration, the story goes, Motor City homes have become nearly worthless—poverty porn for coastal snobs, or fodder for urban yuppie real estate fixer-upper fantasies. One could see how this kind of deal might seem pretty enviable from cramped quarters in San Francisco or Brooklyn, but it’s important to understand what a price tag that low symbolizes."

More here.

Detroit-based Shinola founder talks "American made" with Wall St. Journal

Cars aside, watches and bikes are the new big-ticket "Made in Detroit" items. 

Excerpt:

"Not many people would relish the chance to pack up a sunny Southern California life and move to Detroit. But Daniel Caudill, the creative director of Shinola—a manufacturer of watches, bicycles, leather goods and more—has so much in common with the upstart company that he did it gladly. Raised in rural Montana, Mr. Caudill likes a good heritage back-story, and Shinola, a once-iconic shoe-polish brand that became a punch line (as in "You don't know s—from…") in World War II, has one."

More here.

Brookings Institution calls Detroit's Midtown and downtown "innovation districts"

As great minds think alike, they also stick together. The Brookings Institution has noticed the recent spate of tech start-ups in Detroit.

Excerpt:

"As far as clustering innovation in an urban setting goes, Detroit’s Midtown and downtown areas are putting the city on the Brookings Institution’s radar of places in the U.S. where close collaboration is becoming an alternative to urban sprawl and suburban, corporate office islands.

In the Washington, D.C.-based group’s report on rising “innovation districts,” authors Bruce Katz and Julie Wagner describe the areas as compact and transit-friendly, and anchored by educational institutions and large companies.

The authors point to Boston’s South Waterfront, San Francisco’s Mission Bay, Seattle’s South Lake Union area, and the Brooklyn Navy Yard as examples.

In Detroit’s case, the report highlights Henry Ford Health System and Wayne State University leading the charge in Midtown. It says downtown Detroit’s innovation district was “catalyzed” by the decision of mortgage lending giant Quicken Loans to relocate its headquarters there in 2010."

More here

Construction on the comeback in Southeast Michigan

Thanks to new investment in Detroit-area businesses and public transportation, the construction industry is finally hammering away again.

Excerpt:

"The construction industry in Metro Detroit and Michigan as a whole is part of a comeback story that needs to be told, an expert in the field told a local news website.

Chris Fisher, president of the Associated Builders and Contractors of Michigan, told CBS Detroit  the state is undergoing a true renaissance  after years of dormant activity.

"We’re seeing more jobs, we're seeing better jobs and we're building again," Fisher said. "We suffered more than most industries did in Michigan and to see folks getting back to work, to see backlogs improving — it's quite a comeback story and we're thrilled to be a part of that."

There are several projects in downtown Detroit that have appeared to lead the way in Southeast Michigan including  renovation of the David Whitney Building  and plans for the $140 million M-1 Rail project."

More here.

Detroit's Midtown one of 10 best up-and-coming neighborhoods, says USA Today

USA Today mentioned Detroit's Midtown in the same breath as must-visit (or must-live) neighborhoods in Portland, New Orleans, Santa Fe, and the like.

Excerpt:

"The heart of the city,  Detroit's Midtown  is rapidly developing into a surprisingly well-rounded residential area while featuring an abundance of restaurants, galleries, community gardens and markets. Dedicated local entrepreneurs have made Midtown an attractive hub for small businesses with high-end shops like  Hugh  and  Nora, eateries like  Maccabee's at Midtown  and  Great Lakes Coffee Roasting Company  and  Shinola, which makes American-made bicycles, watches, leather goods and journals. Midtown is at the core of the city's M-1 Rail development and non-motorized transportation plans will soon connect the district to Eastern Market and other neighborhoods via greenways and bike paths."

More here
394 Detroit Articles | Page: | Show All
Share this page
0
Email
Print
Signup for Email Alerts