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Rochester : In the News

65 Rochester Articles | Page: | Show All

Metro Detroit home prices climb 20% in June

The spring home-buying season proved to be a bountiful one for regional property values as buyer confidence increased.

Excerpt:

"The median selling price in Metro Detroit rose on an annual basis for a 16th straight month in June, according to figures released Monday by Farmington Hills-based Realcomp, the multiple listing service for southeast Michigan and a small portion of northern Ohio.

The median selling price in Metro Detroit climbed 20.2 percent year-over-year to $149,000 in June. Realcomp defines Metro Detroit as Oakland, Wayne, Livingston and Macomb counties."

More here.

Local school districts rank as best communities for music education

Several southeast Michigan districts – Ann Arbor, Oak Park, Bloomfield Hills, Ann Arbor, Dearborn, Fraser, and Rochester – are attuned to excellence in musical education.

Excerpt:

"This year, the NAMM Foundation designates 376  districts  as Best Communities for Music Education and 96 individual  schools  as SupportMusic Merit Award winners. These districts and schools set the bar in offering students access to comprehensive music education...

More than 2,000 schools and school districts participated in this year's survey, resulting in a 21% increase in designations."

More here.

The Winter Stonefly Search is on

Dodge the winter blahs on January 18, when you can wade in a stream (or at least walk near one) for a good environmental cause. Join the annual Winter Stonefly search, beginning at 10am at the Clinton River Watershed Council office in Rochester Hills.

Excerpt:

"The Winter Stonefly nymphs are one of the most sensitive of all aquatic macro invertebrates that live in our rivers and streams.   These insects are most active and easily found in the month of January when the water temperature is very cold and there is still plenty of leafy debris in the river bottom for stoneflies to forage on.   The presence of stonefly larvae in a stream indicates good water quality.  
  
Volunteers will meet at the CRWC office and from there will split into teams and travel to various sampling locations. Volunteers will then meet back at the office for lunch and hot beverages. Our search will help add to our Adopt-A-Stream Data and will provide a chance to learn about the ecology and conditions of our local streams."
  
To register, contact the CRWC office  (248-601-0606  or e-mail registration@crwc.org).  

Four Metro Detroit cities make list of best places to find a job in Michigan

According to Nerdwallet.com, Livonia, Dearborn, Rochester Hills, Royal Oak, and Novi are cities with good job markets where your paycheck actually buys you something! That's not as common as you'd think.

Excerpt:

"...NerdWallet crunched the numbers to find the best places for job seekers in Michigan, and we did so by asking the following questions:

1. Is the city growing?  We assessed growth in the working-age population, ages 16 and older, from 2009 to 2011 to ensure that the city was attracting workers and exhibiting a trend of upward population growth.

2. Can you afford to live in the city comfortably?  We looked at a city’s median household income to see if workers made a good living. We also analyzed the monthly homeowner costs, including mortgage payments, to see if the city had a reasonable cost of living.

3. Are most people employed?  We looked at the unemployment rate."

More here.

Michigan's cider mills make national hit list of fall travel getaways

Rochester's historic Yates Cider Mill has cropped up on a list of autumn trips to make around the nation.

Excerpt:

"For a farm-style adventure that's full of flavor, make Michigan's cider mills part of your travel itinerary. There are more than 100 of them in the state, many of which offer free admission. Prices per tasting and bushel vary, but a family of four can typically enjoy an afternoon at one of the mills for less than 50 bucks. One popular example is Yates Cider Mill. A working water-powered cider producer since 1863, it is an authentic piece of American agricultural heritage that's bursting with home-spun fun."

More here.

We all deserve a little bit of yoga

Who says you have to run a marathon to feel good ( and do good) ? Try a Yogathon instead.

On Sunday, September 1, the Yoga By Design Foundation will host an all-day Yogathon at Karma Yoga in Bloomfield Hills. Additional classes will be held that same weekend at Red Lotus Yoga in Rochester Hills, Be Nice Yoga in Detroit, House of Yoga in Berkley and Shine On Yoga in Ferndale.

All fees will go to the foundation, which funds yoga programs for underserved populations. Classes start at  6:30 a.m.  and continue back-to-back until  6 p.m.  A $20 donation per class minimum is requested; participants can pre-register or drop in.

Click here for more information, or contact Lynn Medow at ybdfoundation@gmail.com, or 248.939.1367.


Oakland County's job market is healthiest in years

This is the best it's been in years for job seekers in Oakland County, economists say. And the jobs pay well above the minimum wage.

Excerpt:

"On the heels of its strongest two-year job growth in almost 20 years, Oakland County's economy will add nearly 42,000 jobs through 2015, say University of Michigan economists...

In their annual forecast of the Oakland County economy, Fulton and colleague Don Grimes of the U-M Institute for Research on Labor, Employment, and the Economy say that high-wage industries—with average pay of more than $62,000—accounted for more than half of the new private-sector jobs created during the recovery, a trend that will continue throughout the forecast horizon...

Overall, Fulton and Grimes say that Oakland remains among the better local economies in the nation, ranking 10th among 36 comparable U.S. counties on a series of measures that indicate future economic prosperity."

More here.


Downtowns say no to blank walls, yes to active facades

In Oakland County's downtowns these days, businesses that want to put a blank face to the street have to keep walking.

Excerpt:

"Last fall, a developer approached West Bloomfield trustees asking for a zoning change in order to place a storage unit business at Orchard Lake and 14 Mile. Then, a business owner approached asking for approval to open a fitness club in a former dealership on Orchard Lake Road.

"The new businesses didn’t conform to our (zoning)," said Supervisor Michele Economou Ureste.

The requests were for properties in the township’s "town center" — defined back in 2007 as Orchard Lake Road between 14 Mile and Maple roads. In the area, zoning rules require active first floors, not blank walls, which was intended to make that area more appealing to people walking...That desire is enthusiastically echoed in communities across Oakland County."

More here.


Metro Detroit ranks 14th nationally in percentage job growth

In a good comeback story, Metro Detroit is no. 14 in the country in terms of percentage job growth from 2011 to 2012, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

More here.


Post-industrial? Detroit needs a new word

Detroit's economy is facing forward. Now it just needs some new verbiage.

Excerpt:

"Former heavy manufacturing hubs around the Great Lakes like Pittsburgh, Detroit, Cleveland, and Milwaukee often get roped together under the heading of "post-industrial" (when, that is, we're not otherwise identifying them by their prevalence of rust). The term poses at least two problems, though: Industry still exists in many of these places, and the very notion of defining them by their relationship to the past can hamstring us from planning more thoughtfully for their future.

"You've got the 'post-war,' you've got 'post-modern,' you've got 'post-9/11,'" says Paul Kapp, an associate professor in the school of architecture at the University of Illinois and an editor of the book SynergiCity: Reinventing the Postindustrial City. He was speaking Sunday at the annual meeting of the American Planning Association (hosted in what's often considered the post-industrial city of Chicago). "You get to a point," Kapp says, "where you've got to say, 'When does post-something end and you do something new?' I think with 'post-industrial,' we're at that opportunity now. I think it's now time to come up with a new term."

More here.

Atlantic Cities maps Metro Detroit's creative class

A great, comprehensive article on how the 7.2-square-mile greater downtown Detroit is growing posher by the minute, it seems, and how and why its deindustrialized metros (and certain Detroit neighborhoods) are landing the creative class.

Excerpt:

"Two of the top 10 creative class tracts are in Birmingham; two are in Bloomfield Township, and another is in Bloomfield Hills, home to some of the priciest real estate in the U.S. and the Cranbrook educational community. Designed by Finnish architect  Eliel Saarinen, the architecture critic  Paul Goldberger  called Cranbrook "one of the greatest campuses ever created anywhere in the world." University of Michigan's  Little  points out in an email to me: "Cranbrook graduates have added to the cutting edge design and creative communities of Detroit and the nation for decades."

Another top creative class tract is in nearby Troy, a sprawling middle-class suburb with excellent public schools, and the site of a high-end mall, the Somerset Collection. Two are in Huntington Woods, a leafy neighborhood that boasts such notable amenities as the public golf course  Rackham and the Detroit Zoo. Two more are in the "Grosse Pointes" — Grosse Pointe Farms and Grosse Pointe Park — the communities of choice for many of Detroit's old industrial magnates, whose lakeshores are lined with sprawling Gilded Age mansions."

More here.

Pure Michigan Singalong shows off Metro Detroit, becomes a web sensation

Come on, you gotta have a heart of stone not to be touched by this clever Pure Michigan promotional. And at nearly 2 million views in less than 2 weeks that's a helluva successful campaign.
 
Let's see if I caught all of our region's reps. There's the Erebus' ghouls (Pontiac), a high falutin' toast in Rochester, Royal Oak's polar bears, a Southfield weatherman, The Henry Ford (Dearborn), Ann Arbor's Big House, Detroit's Comerica Park, Lions, DIA, and Fox Theater, an ice rink in Novi, and the Ypsilanti Water Tower. Did I miss any?
 
Check out the video below.
 
 

Coldwell Banker picks 5 metro Detroit cities as hippest in Michigan

Coldwell Banker Real Estate has started to enter the "Best Of" game, ranking communities by what they think their customers are seeking. For their first (of five) lists they evaluated the social scene in cities around the country and picked the places they thought were hippest. Nothing in Michigan made the Top 10, but within the Mitten Ann Arbor, Birmingham, Huntington Woods, and Rochester came out as tops.

Check out their list here.


Rochester company's expansion profiled in NY Times article

A recent NY Times article about how small businesses found success through expansion during the recession uses Rochester-based Bandals as an example for how it's done.

Excerpt:

"Lots of people advise staying aggressive during a difficult economy, but spending money when times are tough can be scary. This small-business guide looks at how Bandals and two other companies managed to do it.

CONSIDER NEW MARKETS When Mr. Sesti decided to focus on increasing revenue, his first thought was to find ways to balance the seasonality of Bandals, which sell best in warm months."

Read the rest of the story here.

GM invests in local solar start-up, commits $200M to VC

Not wanting to miss the innovation boat, GM emerges from bankruptcy to become an aggressive investor in venture capital.

Excerpt:

With a solar charging station as a backdrop, GM's venture capital unit touts a $7.5 million investment in Sunlogics, at the solar energy system maker's new headquarters in a former auto parts plant in Rochester Hills, Michigan.

The investment, announced last month, gives GM Ventures a stake in a company building solar charging equipment. It comes out of a $200 million venture capital budget GM earmarked to spend over three years in response to fears that the world's largest automaker could lose out on the next big thing to start-ups such as electric car maker Tesla Motors

Read the rest of the story here.
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