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UV Angel closes on 7-figure seed round for infection-fighting tech

UV Angel has just closed on a angel round of seed capital worth at least $1 million to help further develop its infection-fighting technology.

The Livonia-based firm makes an innovative disinfection technology for hospitals and clinics. The idea is to prevent healthcare-associated infections, which can include nasty superbugs like H1N1 and MRSA. Such infections kill more than 75,000 people each year.

"We have had more healthcare-associated infection fatalities in the last year than there were deaths in Vietnam and the War on Terror combined," says Michael Armstrong, vice president of UV Angel.

UV Angel's platform continuously monitors device interactions and employs an automated disinfection process to create a safe working environment in medical centers. Each interaction between a medical professional and a piece of equipment (think computer keyboard or mice) initiates or pauses a cleaning cycle.

"We go after the high-touch surfaces and kill whatever is there," Armstrong says.

"Everything we do we record," he adds. "Nobody else does that."

UV Angel currently has pilot studies of its technology underway, which have shown that they consistently eliminate superbugs. Today a team of about 10 people at UV Angel are working on the technology and commercializing it. The firm recently hired three sales reps.

Source: Michael Armstrong, vice president of UV Angel
Writer: Jon Zemke

Read more about Metro Detroit's growing entrepreneurial ecosystem at SEMichiganStartup.com.

MagWerks LED develops cutting edge light technology

LED lights have a reputation as being lean, mean, and ultra-energy-efficient. The reality is, however, that the less energy they use, the heavier they become. It's a challenge that's keeping LED lights from reaching their full potential.

"It's a largely unknown subject but an important one," says Michael Pickholz, CEO of MagWerks LED.

The Oxford-based startup believes it has an answer for that dilemma. The LED lighting design and engineering firm’s technology aims to make high-powered LED lights smaller, lighter, and cooler. The first target market is automotive lights. MagWerks technology leverages the structural properties of magnesium, which is 20 times stronger than plastics.

"It brings a vast improvement in performance," Pickholz says. "It makes it lighter and brighter."

The 3-person firm has recently joined Automation Alley's 7Cs program, which helps new companies leverage advanced manufacturing practices to grow their business.

"There is a need," Pickholz says. "How can you grow a company fast enough to satisfy that need?"

Source: Michael Pickholz, CEO of MagWerks LED
Writer: Jon Zemke

Read more about Metro Detroit's growing entrepreneurial ecosystem at SEMichiganStartup.com.

Transitions Legal partners with Vezina Law in downtown Birmingham

Working together is often the sort of business strategy that not only brings firms together but helps them become more successful. Those benefits are why two small law firms in downtown Birmingham are collaborating.

Transitions Legal and its principal attorney, Alisa Peskin-Shepherd, are now of counsel with Vezina Law. The idea is that each firm’s expertise will help complement the other’s strengths.

"We each have something that adds to our respective firms," Peskin-Shepherd says.

Transitions Legal specializes in family law and mediation. Peskin-Shepherd has grown to a staff of two people. Vezina Law focuses on business, healthcare, and employment law. It has offices in Michigan and Louisiana.

"They have been referring cases to us for two years," Peskin-Shepherd says. "We wanted to formalize that relationship."

Source: Alisa Peskin-Shepherd, principal of Transitions Legal
Writer: Jon Zemke

Read more about Metro Detroit's growing entrepreneurial ecosystem at SEMichiganStartup.com.

CulturecliQ's software helps employers make the right hires via company culture

Hiring people isn't as easy as it sounds. Companies spends lots of time, money, and resources finding the right people that will fit into their operation. CulturecliQ thinks it has found a more efficient way to help them make the right hires.

The Livonia-based startup has developed a software platform (with the help of eyeWyre Software Studios in downtown Mt. Clemens) that matches companies and candidates based on whether the candidate would fit in with the company's culture.

"It's an easy-to-use tool to find candidates without sifting through thousands of resumes," says Joe Walker, COO of CulturecliQ.

Walker started CulturecliQ with Colleen Albright about a year ago. The pair used to work at Plunkett & Cooney where he was a partner and she worked in human resources, and then worked together at R. L. Polk & Co. Albright had the idea for the company a couple of years ago and the two decided to leave the corporate world for the startup world.

The system uses specifically targeted questions for the companies and candidates. The idea is to help both parties learn more about each other by providing them with more information than would be in a resume or on a company's website. CulturecliQ's software then sorts the different data points about the people to find the best fit for the job.

"With today’s talent shortage, people are hiring on soft skills because the hard skills can be taught," Walker says.

CulturecliQ went live in January. It currently has 40 companies and 500 job candidates using it. The company plans to do a wider release this spring across southeast Michigan and then beyond.

"We're ready to do a hard launch by May 1st," Walker says.

Source: Joe Walker, COO of CulturecliQ
Writer: Jon Zemke

Read more about Metro Detroit's growing entrepreneurial ecosystem at SEMichiganStartup.com.

Oakland University spins out first tech startup, Fulcrum Engineering

The first startup to spin out of Oakland University wants to make your vehicle safer by making its parts disengage during catastrophic accidents.

Fulcrum Engineering is developing technology that enables structural joints in a vehicles to decouple during big accidents. The idea is the force of the accident is displaced to better protect the motorists.

"We have shown we can reduce the force that is felt by the occupants of the vehicle by 60 percent," says Michael Latcha, president of Fulcrum Engineering.

Latcha is also an associate professor at Oakland University. He discovered the idea for the technology when trying to figure out ways to protect military vehicles from IED explosions. He found that if things like the engine or transmission were able to decouple during an explosion, then the force of the blast would also be displaced and better protect the people inside the vehicle.

"All your left with is the shell of the vehicle protecting the occupants," Latcha says.

Fulcrum Engineering is trying to commercialize that technology for use in everyday vehicles like sedans and work trucks. The idea is that only major accidents would enable the decoupling of the structural joints, not fender benders.

The Rochester-based startup launched last November. It made the finals of the Global Automotive Innovation Challenge and is currently working to license its technology to automotive suppliers.

Source: Michael Latcha, president of Fulcrum Engineering
Writer: Jon Zemke

Read more about Metro Detroit's growing entrepreneurial ecosystem at SEMichiganStartup.com.

Crazy Diamond Performance aims to commercialize natural gas tech

Kevin Fern made a career as two things: a serial entrepreneur and a veteran of the alternative fuel vehicle industry. He is using both to build up his new firm, Crazy Diamond Performance.

The Shelby Township-based startup specializes in natural gas technology for automobiles. It is working to help transition more vehicles away from relying on gasoline for power to using compressed natural gas.

"We see a lot of merit in natural gas-powered vehicles," says Steven Bridson, business development manager of Crazy Diamond Performance. "It is beneficial to the U.S. because there is a lot of natural gas here."

The 3-year-old firm is utilizing compressed natural gas (a clear, odorless, and non-corrosive fuel) in its products. When combusted in a vehicle, it produces lower exhaust emissions, reducing carbon dioxide by 25 percent, and there are almost no evaporative emissions. With 120-octane and nearly the same energy content as gasoline, current generation compressed natural gas engines are just as powerful as their gasoline counterparts.

Crazy Diamond Performance currently has a team of four people working on its technology. It recently hired two people and is planning to hire more soon.

"We expect to bring on more people as the project we are working on are approved and funded," Bridson says.

Crazy Diamond Performance recently joined Automation Alley's 7Cs program, which helps small companies learn the basics of manufacturing and how to turn it to their advantage when growing their business.

"We think the 7Cs program will help us get the Crazy Diamond Performance message out to the industry," Bridson says.

Source: Steven Bridson, business development manager of Crazy Diamond Performance
Writer: Jon Zemke

Read more about Metro Detroit's growing entrepreneurial ecosystem at SEMichiganStartup.com.

Insert Catchy Headlines marks 10 years as an independent, woman-owned business

Josephine Dries' life changed 10 years ago. That was the time she started her own public relations firm, Insert Catchy Headlines. In a way, it was her method for declaring her own independence.

Dries worked in a family business for years. It was a situation where the men of the family took leading roles. Dries felt limited. She wanted to be in a situation where she could excel and occupy an equal role to everyone else. That meant striking out on her own.

"I said, 'OK, that’s good for you. Why can't I do it?'" Dries says. "If I can’t do it under your umbrella, then I will stand on my own two feet and do it on my own."

She never looked back. Today her Rochester Hills-based business is not only her full-time job, but Dries has been so successful that she raised her firm's prices. She plans to hire her first employee over the next year, and even attract a major local corporation as a client. Today Insert Catchy Headlines serves primarily small and medium-sized businesses.

"I went from one monthly client (when the business launched) to four monthly clients," Dries says.

Source: Josephine Dries, founder of Insert Catchy Headlines
Writer: Jon Zemke

Read more about Metro Detroit's growing entrepreneurial ecosystem at SEMichiganStartup.com.

TelNet Worldwide opens Southfield data center

TelNet Worldwide is opening a new data center in Southfield, transforming a several-year-old building that had never been occupied into a state-of-the-art tech hub.

The Troy-based business opened a Tier III data center, renovating an existing building that was built in a tech park. "It was a brand-new building that has been empty for five years," says Mark Iannuzzi, president of TelNet Worldwide.

The 40,000-square-foot  facility is designed, equipped, and operated to standards ensuring high availability of mission-critical data and applications in a secure environment for industries such as health care, finance, manufacturing, and government. That makes the facility a Tier III data center, one level below the top-of-the-line (Tier IV) data centers.

TelNet Worldwide choose to put the data center in Southfield because of its proximity to numerous businesses, among other reasons.

"There is a very rich vein of fiber going through that area for a number of reasons," Iannuzzi says.

TelNet Worldwide has hired 30 people over the last year, expanding the company’s workforce to 135 employees and an intern. It is also looking to hire six new people right now, including technicians, support, engineers, and sales. Two of those positions are for the new data center.

Source: Mark Iannuzzi, president of TelNet Worldwide
Writer: Jon Zemke

Read more about Metro Detroit's growing entrepreneurial ecosystem at SEMichiganStartup.com.

Mt. Clemens-based eyeWyre Software Studios adds staff

2015 is turning out to be a very good year for eyeWyre Software Studios. The downtown Mt. Clemens-based firm has watched the volume of its work spike by 25 percent in the first quarter.

That has allowed eyeWyre Software Studios to hire a project manager, expanding its staff to a dozen employees and a dozen interns from Macomb Community College and a high school intern from Utica Community Schools. The company is also looking to hire a couple of software engineers.

"The first quarter of this year has been incredible for us," says Matt Chartier, president of eyeWyre Software Studios. "There has been a huge volume of activity."

One of its major projects is launching this spring -- an online recruiting system for culturecliQ. EyeWyre Software Studios designed and developed the software platform with a patent-pending algorithm that assesses and matches a company’s culture and needs to candidate’s employment requirements.

"The systems is pre-screening the candidate to fit the culture," Chartier says. "It's also doing the same for the candidate."

The idea is that there is a simpler way to find the right culture fit for an open position that doesn't require reading thousands of words from resumes and work samples. The hope is that the technology leads to better workplace matches with more longevity. It launched earlier this spring and Chartier expects it to gain traction through the rest of this year.

"It's a whole new way to think about recruiting," Chartier says.

Source: Matt Chartier, president of eyeWyre Software Studios
Writer: Jon Zemke

Read more about Metro Detroit's growing entrepreneurial ecosystem at SEMichiganStartup.com.

Berylline Corp. builds three-wheeled hybrid scooter that gets 100 mpg

When people think of hybrid vehicles, they usually picture cars -- maybe heavy trucks and buses. Berylline Corp. wants you to think of its three-wheeled scooters.

"We saw there was a void in the (hybrid vehicle) market for a scooter, a three-wheeled trike," says Dennis Dresser, president of Berylline Corp.

The Troy-based company has created a three-wheeled vehicle called the Berylline F2A hybrid scooter. The scooter has two wheels in the front and one in the rear. It weighs about 300 pounds and gets 100 mpg thanks to its hybrid system that includes a lithium-ion battery.

"You can drive it exclusively in electric mode or exclusively in gas mode or any combination," Dresser says.

The Berylline F2A hybrid scooter comes with a six-pound lithium-ion battery that is removable from the main body of the vehicle. The idea is to enable users to bring it inside their home and charge when they are not riding the bike.

"We wanted to make it as accessible as possible," Dresser says.

Berylline's team of seven people is currently showing off the scooter with the idea of raising money for production. Dresser hopes to raise $5 million in seed capital this year with an eye for selling the scooters next year.

Source: Dennis Dresser, president of Berylline Corp
Writer: Jon Zemke

Read more about Metro Detroit's growing entrepreneurial ecosystem at SEMichiganStartup.com.

Turbo-Teck launches new electronics website, Cablecables.com

Turbo-Teck is launching a new website, Cablecables.com, with the idea of providing electronics hardware odds and ends at a competitive price.

"Pricing is becoming quite a bit of an issue in the electronics industry," says Jay Askerow, CEO of Turbo-Teck. "People got away with high margins for years, but now with China in the picture, everything is much more price sensitive."

The Southfield-based business will sell high performance HDMI cables featuring RedMere technology, television wall mounts, and frameless in-wall, in-ceiling and invisible speakers among other items. The idea is to offer products at low prices that come with online sales and ship from a central location in the Midwest.

The 1-year-old company currently employs three people and is looking to hire two more in sales and operations. That team is working to make Turbo-Teck the least expensive option for home entertainment center accessory hardware in North America.

"We have quite a few people who buy from us nationally," Askerow says. "We have consumers and installers."

Source: Jay Askerow, CEO of Turbo-Teck
Writer: Jon Zemke

Read more about Metro Detroit's growing entrepreneurial ecosystem at SEMichiganStartup.com.

Southfield-based Nexcess hires 19, grows staff to over 100

Nexcess is a tech company on a significant growth curve, but things haven't always been this good for the Southfield-based company. While it has enjoyed about 30 percent revenue growth over each of the last few years, the web hosting firm had a rocky start when it launched in 2000.

"The first six years were hand to mouth," says Chris Wells, CEO of Nexcess. "It took a long time to be able to feed ourselves."

That was then. Today, Nexcess employs a staff of 112 people and several interns. It has hired 19 people over the last year, primarily people in technical support, system administration, and software engineering. It's still looking to hire a few people now.

"We're always looking for support technicians, system administrators, and software engineers," Wells says.

Nexcess' growth ride is being powered primarily through its work with e-commerce. Wells points out a number of businesses turned to e-commerce solutions when the economy went south and that trend has not abated since. However, Nexcess is looking to diversify more with work in cloud computing and virtualization.

Source: Chris Wells, CEO of Nexcess
Writer: Jon Zemke

Read more about Metro Detroit's growing entrepreneurial ecosystem at SEMichiganStartup.com.

Vectorform partners with DTE to launch Powerley

A downtown Royal Oak tech firm and the biggest utility in Michigan are partnering to launch a new startup aimed at helping mobile users be more energy efficient.

Powerley is the product of a joint venture between DTE Energy and Vectorform, a digital experience company. The 1-month-old venture is launching a platform for utility customers to link their smartphones to smart meters, enabling them to take a comprehensive look at their energy use.

"Powerley can bring the technology and the expertise in energy efficiency to world," says Kevin Foreman, CTO of Powerley.

The Powerley home-energy-monitoring platform can help track energy usage down to the consumption of individual electrical devices. It also provides personalized tips on how to best save energy. Check out a video describing it here.

"A lot of our early adopters are either retirees or not as technology savvy as you would think," Foreman says.

The Powerley platform has been three years in the making. The joint venture currently employs six people and is looking to add a few more. Vectorform has also worked with DTE Energy to produce the DTE Insight mobile app, which allows utility customers to monitor and personalize their energy consumption patterns.

Source: Kevin Foreman, CTO of Powerley
Writer: Jon Zemke

Read more about Metro Detroit's growing entrepreneurial ecosystem at SEMichiganStartup.com.

C&G Solutions PLC triples staff in Southfield

Jehan Crump-Gibson worked for many years as an attorney in both government and corporate settings. Those experiences inspired her to launch her own firm, C&G Solutions PLC.

"These were great experiences, but I didn't feel I had the autonomy to really help my clients," Crump-Gibson says.

She launched the legal practice five years ago. Today the Southfield-based firm serves the metro Detroit area and specializes in a broad variety of subjects, including civil litigation, probate, government affairs, and business law. Over the last year, the firm has grown its revenue by 35 percent, allowing it to make its first hires (an attorney and a clerk), expanding its team to three people.

"I have been able to grow personally and give some people some great work experiences," Crump-Gibson says.

That growth has come from word-of-mouth recommendations by C&G Solutions PLC's clients.

"My clients are pleased with my work and are helping me," Crump-Gibson says.

Source: Jehan Crump-Gibson, managing member of C&G Solutions PLC
Writer: Jon Zemke

Read more about Metro Detroit's growing entrepreneurial ecosystem at SEMichiganStartup.com.

UltraLevel spins out CloudSAFE in Southfield

UltraLevel, an IT firm, is spinning out a private cloud computing company called CloudSAFE this week.

"Our customers are companies like UltraLevel," says Michael L. Butz, Sr., founder & CEO of UltraLevel. "We have three partners, and we are working to grow it from there."

CloudSAFE offers integrated private and hybrid cloud services with live technical support. Its initial products include providing IT infrastructure out of the office and into a secure private cloud, IT disaster recovery services, a managed firewall protection services, and voice-over IP services.

The company is currently covering the Midwest and part of the Washington, D.C., area. Butz has plans to make the company a national player within the next 12 months.

"I'd like to establish us as North America’s premier private cloud computing company," Butz says.

CloudSAFE currently employs a team of 15 people and is hiring.

"We expect to double in the next 12 months," Butz says.

Source: Michael L. Butz, Sr., founder & CEO of UltraLevel
Writer: Jon Zemke

Read more about Metro Detroit's growing entrepreneurial ecosystem at SEMichiganStartup.com.
3210 Articles | Page: | Show All
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