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Troy's blueRock Technologies makes 5 hires on 30% sales growth

Troy-based blueRock Technologies has earned a couple of nice spikes over the last year.

The first comes from an additional five hires in technical and project management positions, expanding the company’s staff to 19 employees. It is also looking to hire another two technical staff right now.

The second is in its revenue. The IT company enjoyed a 30-percent bump over the last year. Most of those new sales have come from the hospitality industry. The 14-year-old firm has a number of clients that are nightclubs, restaurants, and hotels on the east coast.

"We have really increased our footprint in those areas," says Peter Marsack, vice president of consulting for blueRock Technologies. "We have a lot of clients in this area as well."

The IT firm also provides consulting and cloud-based services for its clients. One of its aims is to help pair clients with the best technology for their business model. The strategy is paying off, and blueRock Technologies is optimistic about its near-future prospects.

"We're going to continue growing the business in the hospitality market," Marsack says. "We're definitely going to be bringing on more people."

Source: Peter Marsack, vice president of consulting for blueRock Technologies
Writer: Jon Zemke

Read more about Metro Detroit's growing entrepreneurial ecosystem at SEMichiganStartup.com.

Climate Technologies develops new way of cutting pollution emissions

Climate Technologies has reinvented itself in recent years as a company that works in both the automotive and green-tech sectors.

Today the Farmington Hills-based company is growing at a healthy clip while it continues to develop both ends of its business. Its revenue is up 15 percent in the last year, enabling it to hire another engineer in that time. It now employs six people.

"It's the rebounding of the automotive industry primarily," says Walt Zimmerman, CEO of Climate Technologies.

The 44-year-old company got its start providing temperature and humidity-control services for the automotive suppliers. The rebounding automotive industry has helped beef up that business. It has also gotten work from larger organizations, such as hospitals and universities.

Climate Technologies has also been developing a new way of cutting pollution emissions. The climate-control technology captures toxic gases and concentrates them so they can be used in things like fuel cells. It's now working on a next-generation version that integrates natural gas into the mix to make it more efficient.

"It's a large step forward," Zimmerman says. "It makes the technology appealing to people with pollution-control issues."

Source: Walt Zimmerman, CEO of Climate Technologies
Writer: Jon Zemke

Read more about Metro Detroit's growing entrepreneurial ecosystem at SEMichiganStartup.com.

Wayne State grad/musician starts music production firm, J IV Media

Alton James has long dreamed of working in music. So much so that he even recently worked as an independent contractor for larger firms on the coast, providing musical scores for a variety of broadcast productions.

Now the Wayne State University graduate is doing it on his own with his new company, J IV Media.

"Why should I just be a subcontractor?" James says. "Why not start my own business?"

James worked with the Blackstone LaunchPad program at Wayne State to set up the basics of his business. He recently got engaged and opened his own studio in his new house in Chesterfield Township.

"We love the homes and the community out here," James says.

J IV Media is currently working on providing musical work for two documentaries. One has a Detroit-rebound focus and is locally based. The second is out of New York City and focuses on the for-profit prison system. James is also working with a number of University of Michigan film students on their projects.

"I would love to do some commercials for local businesses," James says.

Source: Alton James, owner of J IV Media
Writer: Jon Zemke

Read more about Metro Detroit's growing entrepreneurial ecosystem at SEMichiganStartup.com.

Southfield's Ayar Law Group takes off with tax law work, adds 5 jobs

When Venar Ayar launched his own tax law practice, Ayar Law Group, two years ago he quickly realized he had a growing problem. But it was a good problem.

The Southfield-based firm's legal services were so in demand that Ayar had to move out of the 10-foot by 12-foot office within three months because he hired his first employee. Three months later he had to move to a bigger office after he hired two more people. Three months later, Ayar Law Group moved to its current offices to accommodate its growth.
 
"This office is almost to the point where I am at capacity," Ayar says. "I have grown so fast."

Ayar Law Group offers legal services in tax law, including audit defense, tax-debt relief, negotiating tax settlements, criminal tax fraud defense, and unfiled tax returns. It services individuals, families, and small businesses.

Today Ayar Law Group has a staff of eight employees and three interns, including five hires over the last year. It is currently looking for another attorney to hire and a law student for an internship.

"I am always looking for more law students and lawyers," Ayar says. "I don't plan to stop hiring anytime soon."

Ayar has a Master of Laws in Taxation (the highest degree available in tax law practice) from the University of San Diego School of Law. He also worked as an IRS defense lawyer for five years. He started Ayar Law Group two years ago because he saw a huge uptick in tax troubles thanks to the Great Recession and the economy was finally improving to the point that people were becoming optimistic.

"It was sort of the perfect time for this," Ayar says.

Source: Venar Ayar, principal of Ayar Law Group
Writer: Jon Zemke

Read more about Metro Detroit's growing entrepreneurial ecosystem at SEMichiganStartup.com.

SurClean scores $25,000 win at Accelerate Michigan

SurClean added another $25,000 to its ledger when it walked away from the Accelerate Michigan Innovation Competition earlier this month.

The Wixom-based startup won the Product and Services category, which comes with a check for $25,000 in seed capital. SurClean plans to add that money to the Series A round of investment it is currently raising, and use it to help secure its intellectual property.

"We're in the process of filing numerous patents," says Susan Sprentall, CEO of SurClean.

The company is developing a laser-based technology that replaces the harmful chemicals, media blasting, and other abrasives typically used in the removal of paint and other coatings from aircraft, vessels, and bridges undergoing maintenance. Its system uses a laser beam to disintegrate and remove paint and other coatings like rust from substrate in a cost-effective, safe, energy-efficient and earth-friendly way.

The company launched the first generation of the product this year. It's in the process of developing the second generation of the product and should be ready to bring it to market by next spring.

"We should have established sales in the aviation sector (by then)," Sprentall says. "We should also be moving forward in the bridge and U.S. Dept. of Transportation sector by then."

SurClean currently has a staff of five employees and two interns. It is also looking to hire another three people right now, and 10-15 additional by the end of next year.

Source: Susan Sprentall, CEO of SurClean
Writer: Jon Zemke

Read more about Metro Detroit's growing entrepreneurial ecosystem at SEMichiganStartup.com.

Jet-setting firm Broadsword cultivates consulting work in backyard

When the economy went south, Broadsword branched out.

The tech consulting company had once relied on the local automotive and manufacturing industries, but added work with the federal government, specifically the U.S. Dept. of Defense. Today the Livonia-based firm company is looking to flesh out its local work.

Broadsword has watched its revenue jump 30 percent over the last year, mostly by expanding its customer base outside of Metro Detroit.

"It was mostly new customers," says Jeff Dalton, president of Broadsword. "We're starting to expand our work with our existing customers."

Broadsword specializes in leveraging Agile and Lean methods to drive up performance engineering using its AgileCMMI methodology and collaborative consulting and coaching solutions. Some of its clients include Rockwell Collins, NASA, Boeing, Chrysler, Compuware and L-3 Communications.

The company currently employs 10 people. It has hired two over the last year, including senior- and junior-level consultants. It it currently looking to hire two more consultants.

Source: Jeff Dalton, president of Broadsword
Writer: Jon Zemke

Read more about Metro Detroit's growing entrepreneurial ecosystem at SEMichiganStartup.com.

Synergy System Solutions brings alternative energy to Michigan

Jerry Eden has worded in the energy industry for 20-plus years, including more than a dozen in an electricians union. In that time he has noticed Michigan seems to be lacking when it comes to keeping up with technological improvements.

"We seem to lag behind a little bit as far as technology advancement in Michigan," Eden says. "Sometimes a lot."

So he started to do something about it six months ago by starting Synergy System Solutions. The Royal Oak-based startup specializes in integrating new technology into everyday uses. More times than not that has to do with adding alternative energy to the mix.

That could mean adding solar arrays to light poles to help keep streetlights on more cost-effectively. Or adding alternative energy generators to machines that work in remote places, such as the blinking arrows that steer construction traffic in the right direction far away from the nearest electrical plug.

Eden has been working with a number of different alternative energy players in Metro Detroit, including the Green Team Coalition at the NextEnergy campus in Detroit's New Center neighborhood. He hopes these projects help create more jobs in Michigan. It has already led to the creation of a three-person staff at Synergy System Solutions.

"I want us to be at the forefront of Michigan’s disruptive technology," Eden says. "Doing things differently, but innovative."

Source: Jerry Eden, president of Synergy System Solutions
Writer: Jon Zemke

Read more about Metro Detroit's growing entrepreneurial ecosystem at SEMichiganStartup.com.

Minority Business Access Fund aims to spread $100M across metro Detroit

The Michigan Minority Supplier Development Council is making $100 million in liquidity funding available to minority-owned businesses across Metro Detroit.

The Minority Business Access Fund is a loan vehicle for small- and medium-sized businesses in need of capital to get them through a revenue hiccup and set the stage for more growth. The $100 million is expected to have legs beyond its first year.

"If we're successful in getting $100 million out in the first year we will be able to get $100 million out there again in the second year," says Louis Green, president of the Michigan Minority Supplier Development Council.

The Minority Business Access Fund expects to make 75 to 100 loans in its first year. The recipients are expected to be all kinds of minority-owned companies, such as multi-million dollar automotive suppliers and family-owned businesses.

Liquidity financing often helps companies bridge the gap between filling and order and collecting the revenue if the customer can't pay on time. Liquidity financing often pays a critical role in enabling the borrower to pay its bills and make payroll. Minority-owned firms have long struggled with obtaining loans from traditional sources, such as banks.

Source: Louis Green, president of the Michigan Minority Supplier Development Council
Writer: Jon Zemke

Read more about Metro Detroit's growing entrepreneurial ecosystem at SEMichiganStartup.com.

SE Michigan firms dominate Accelerate Michigan competition

Eleven startups took home cash prizes at last week's Accelerate Michigan Innovation Competition and each one of them is based in southeast Michigan.

While Ann Arbor-based firms took home the lion's share of the winnings, companies based in Metro Detroit also won some of the category awards worth $25,000 apiece. Those winners included Wixom-based SurClean (Product and Service category), Plymouth-based Beet Analytics Technology (Manufacturing), and Detroit-based Inventev (Advanced Transportation).

Ann Arbor-based firms SkySpecs (drone technology) and Cribspot (online platform for off-campus housing) took the top two spots worth $500,000 and $100,000, respectively. Ann Arbor startups also took six of the nine category wins. More info on those here.

Accelerate Michigan is an annual business plan competition held in downtown Detroit. It aims to promote and grow the cream of the crop of startups based in Michigan or looking to move to the Great Lakes state. Its $1 million in prize money and services also serves as a motivational tool to push startups closer to investment and commercialization.

"It's a very good learning process," says David Wang, CEO of Beet Analytics Technology. "I have never prepared so much for a 10-minute pitch process."

Beet Analytics Technology provides diagnostic and analytical tools that accelerate problem solving in complex manufacturing and automation operations. Its software improves problem identification and reduces production downtime so the user can optimize productivity gains.

SurClean is developing a laser-based technology that replaces the harmful chemicals, media blasting, and other abrasives typically used in the removal of paint and other coatings from aircraft, vessels, and bridges undergoing maintenance. Its technology uses a laser beam to disintegrate and remove paint and other coatings like rust from substrate in a cost-effective, safe, energy-efficient and earth-friendly way.

Inventev is creating a hybrid-electric system for commercial trucks. The technology is a new transmission architecture that allows electric machines to operate other aspects of the trucks, such as the hydraulic lift. That way the truck's diesel engines don't need to idle while they dump their load.

Source: David Wang, CEO of Beet Analytics Technology
Writer: Jon Zemke

Read more about Metro Detroit's growing entrepreneurial ecosystem at SEMichiganStartup.com.

Beet Analytics Technology scores win at Accelerate Michigan

Beet Analytics Technology was already on a significant growth spurt. Now it has a win at last week's Accelerate Michigan Innovation Competition to add to that momentum.

The Plymouth-based tech firm won the Manufacturing category of the Accelerate Michigan competition, putting $25,000 in seeding capital toward its growth plans. The 3-year-old manufacturing software startup plans to use the prize money toward further developing its platform and acquiring more hardware for it.

"We are prepared for another leap forward," says David Wang, CEO of Beet Analytics Technology. "We have had a lot of interest."

Beet Analytics Technology is developing diagnostic and analytical tools that accelerate problem solving in complex manufacturing and automation operations. Its software improves problem identification and reduces production downtime so the user can optimize productivity gains. The company has landed a couple of contracts with original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) from around the world and now claims to have landed contracts or is in talks to sign with half of the 10 largest OEMs in the world. It has hired seven people over the last year, expanding its staff to a dozen employees.

This activity led it to give the Accelerate Michigan competition a try this year. The annual business plan competition is Michigan's pre-eminent contest for startups, awarding $1 million in seed capital and services each year. The top prize is for $500,000. Wang and his team left the competition impressed with what they saw.

"I was amazed by how many quality entrepreneurs there are in Michigan," Wang says. "I was happy to meet all of them."

Source: David Wang, CEO of Beet Analytics Technology
Writer: Jon Zemke

Read more about Metro Detroit's growing entrepreneurial ecosystem at SEMichiganStartup.com.

IT security firm VioPoint adds to staff in Auburn Hills

Every tech firm is looking to carve out its own niche in the digital landscape. VioPoint is using its new niche as a platform for its recent growth spurt.

The Auburn Hills-based tech firm specializes in cyber security and offers strategic consulting services on top of that. It has recently targeted its focus on providing an active digital defense for small-to-midsize companies.

"We realized there is a niche where there were all of these security breaches," says Kelsey Marsh, marketing coordinator for VioPoint. "Often they don't have the budget or don't realize they need security."

VioPoint steps in and offers a comprehensive solution of managed IT security services. What makes it attractive to small businesses is that since it's all inclusive it can be more affordable.

"It draws the costs down for our clients because we can create efficiencies and synergies," says Mike Pokas, vice president of consulting services for VioPoint.

The rising demand for those services has allowed VioPoint to grow, hiring four people in IT security consulting over the last year. It now employs a staff of 25. VioPoint is projecting a spike in revenue of 30-35 percent this year, and it's optimistic it can hit that number again in 2015.

"The bad guys aren't going away," Pokas says.

Source: Kelsey Marsh, marketing coordinator for VioPoint and Mike Pokas, vice president of consulting services for VioPoint
Writer: Jon Zemke

Read more about Metro Detroit's growing entrepreneurial ecosystem at SEMichiganStartup.com.

Soothsayer Analytics launches out of Livonia

A new analytics startup is launching out of Livonia, and it's looking to start making a name for itself as the company that can translate the effectiveness of cutting-edge algorithms into everyday English.

Soothsayer Analytics likes to describe itself as a data science and machine-learning startup. It aims to use machine learning and statistical techniques to find hidden insights and patterns from complex and unstructured data.

The 3-month-old company currently has a core team of six employees and nine advisors, along with some help from overseas universities. It is also in the process of hiring another employee.

"We have some really respected people in a variety of different fields," says Christopher Dole, partner of Soothsayer Analytics. "We expect to do some really exciting work."

Some of the projects in the pipeline include a technology that will be able to forecast which college football players will make the transition to the NFL, and which team each individual player would do best with. It’s also working on a mathematical model that will help predict things like stroke or heart attack.

Soothsayer Analytics is hosting a conference at 9 a.m. Friday, Nov. 14. It will feature a two-hour presentation by Murthy Kolluru that aims to demystify data science. The idea is to provide business leaders with a deeper understanding of the subject by emphasizing intuition instead of the math behind some cutting-edge algorithms and concepts like machine learning.

The event will be held at 21000 W. 10 Mile Road in Southfield in Room M336. For information click here.

Source: Christopher Dole, partner of Soothsayer Analytics
Writer: Jon Zemke

Read more about Metro Detroit's growing entrepreneurial ecosystem at SEMichiganStartup.com.

Inteva continues to grow in Troy

Lots of companies like to call themselves global because they have an office in Europe or a sales employee in Asia. Inteva Products likes to call itself a global firm because it employs 11,500 people in 18 countries.

The automotive supplier specializes in everything from interior systems to engineering. It employs 300 people at its Troy headquarters after making a handful of new hires over the last year.

"There have been a number of hirings," says Karen Manardo, global director of marketing & communications for Inteva Products.

Inteva Products spun out of Delphi in 2008. It acquired Arvin Meritor in 2011, a move that essentially doubled its size.

"That was our biggest growth phase," Manardo says.

The company went from $1.2 billion in sales to $2.4 billion. It has since grown quickly, with its revenue edging up to about $2.8 billion.

"We have continued to grow, particularly in China," Manardo says. "That's our biggest growth area."

Source: Karen Manardo, global director of marketing & communications for Inteva Products
Writer: Jon Zemke

Read more about Metro Detroit's growing entrepreneurial ecosystem at SEMichiganStartup.com.

Oakland University students build diabetes app, TypeOneTwo

A trio of Oakland University computer science majors placed at the MHacks hackathon in Ann Arbor with its diabetes mobile app.

Andrew Clissold, Steven Wiggins and Brandon Powell are the undergrads behind TypeOneTwo. The mobile app helps people who live with diabetes track and analyze their glucose and insulin levels.

"I have been wanting to make an app to help me better track my stuff," says Powell, who also lives with Type 1 diabetes.

The friends built out the app during the MHacks software programming competition at the University of Michigan earlier this fall. The 2-month-old startup placed in the top 10 after the 36-hour hackathon, and set the stage to further develop the app into a business.

"This was something that was fun for all of us and could help other people," Powell says. "It was really a blast. We had so much fun. We just sat down and programmed for 36 hours."

The trio behind TypeOneTwo plans to keep developing the app over this winter and launch it to the public in early 2015.

Source: Brandon Powell, co-founder of TypeOneTwo
Writer: Jon Zemke

Read more about Metro Detroit's growing entrepreneurial ecosystem at SEMichiganStartup.com.

MyFastbraces opens new dental practice in Troy

A Saginaw-based dental practice is expanding its firm by bringing a new technology for braces to Michigan, and opening a Metro Detroit location.

Dentists Donald Sabourin and Joel Hayden first ran into Fastbraces, a technology that claims to give people braces to correct their teeth faster and cheaper, while at a conference in Texas a few years ago. They brought the technology to their practice last year, and immediately noticed its popularity.

"We thought we would do five or six cases a month," Sabourin says. "We ended up doing 27 or 28 cases a month. We were like, 'Holy cow!'"

This fall they are opening a satellite location called MyFastbraces in Troy on Big Beaver Road to serve Metro Detroit. Since introducing the technology last year, they have hired an additional seven people including four employees at the Troy office.

Fastbraces were developed by a dentist in Texas as a way to help people correct the path and straighten out crooked teeth faster than traditional braces. Traditional braces move the tooth first and allow the root to follow. Fastbraces moves the root and the tooth at the same time, realigning the root and crown simultaneously. Fastbraces claims to cut the time and money needed to correct the problems by as much as half.

"We like to say half the time and half the price but at twice the comfort," Sabourin says.

MyFastbraces is currently looking to hire two registered dental assistants.

Source: Donald Sabourin, co-owner of MyFastbraces
Writer: Jon Zemke

Read more about Metro Detroit's growing entrepreneurial ecosystem at SEMichiganStartup.com.
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