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Cooley Law School's building ranks as one of world's most impressive

A rainwater harvesting system, a green roof, low flow plumbing and other eco-focused features has landed Cooley Law School in Auburn Hills on the list of the most impressive law school buildings in the world.

Best Choice Schools' independent ranking put Cooley, which has undergone major renovation and a 64,000-square-foot addition, at #35 out of 50 law schools. Architects and engineers from Rockford Construction and SHW Group designed the building.

Cooley's building on its Auburn Hills campus at 2630 Featherstone Road is a LEED silver certified facility that was constructed with sustainability at the fore. "Building architects sought to maximize light and air flow throughout the structure with large windows and open spaces," according to Best Choice Schools.

Cooley is the fourth law school in the U.S. to be LEED certified.

Source: Tyler Lecceadone, spokesperson, Cooley Law School, Auburn Hills
Writer: Kim North Shine

 

Farmington Road next big downtown development project

A rebuild of Farmington Road is the next big project to make downtown Farmington into an inviting place for businesses and customers alike.

Annette Knowles, executive director of the Farmington Downtown Development Authority, says the new Farmington Road streetscape will spruce up the the city's main thoroughfare, make it easier to travel and reach businesses, whether by car of foot and, ideally, help local businesses grow and attract new clientele.

One goal of the rebuild is to give restaurants more sidewalk space for outdoor seating.

"We've got our work cut out for us," Knowles says, "but next year we hope to be starting construction."

The project is largely funded by federal grants through the state and will require local, state and federal approvals of the construction plan, which is being drawn up by OHM Advisors and Grissim Metz Andriese Associates.

The Farmington Road streetscape comes on the heels of of the rebuild of Groves Street, a major makeover of a tired shopping center there and the redesign of Riley Park, a downtown gathering spot.

"We're not resting on our laurels or closing the book," Knowles says. "There's always something that needs attention. That's kind of challenge for any community.

"We are providing all of these investments into the downtown to keep us positioned to businesses that need to grow or are looking for attractiveness for relocation."

Source: Annette Knowles, executive director, Farmington Downtown Development Authority
Writer: Kim North Shine

$22 million Neuroscience Center opens at Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak

The first freestanding building to go up on the campus of Beaumont Hospital's Royal Oak campus in more than a decade opened this week.

The three-story, 80,000-square-foot, $22-million Neuroscience Center will give pediatric and adult patients one point of access for the diagnosis and treatment of neurological conditions.

The center was built in anticipation of a growing population of patients 65 and older. The number is expected to double to 72.1 million by 2030. Pediatric patients will also be a focus of the center.

The Neuroscience Center will offer high-tech conference rooms that allow physicians and clinicians to collaborate on patient care, advanced equipment for diagnosis and treatment, rooms designed for comfort and privacy, and more.

There are 11 clinics within the center, including the Ian Jackson Craniofacial Clinic, a pediatric and adult epilepsy clinic, clinics for stroke, spinal, and brain tumors, neuro-oncology, concussion, aneurysm, Parkinson's Disease and others.

The center was developed by Royal Oak-based T.H. Marsh Construction and designed by HKS Architects of Northville.

Source: Angela Blazevski, spokesperson, Beaumont Hospital Royal Oak
Writer: Kim North Shine

Walsh College campus to get $15M addition, renovation

An expansion of space and a refinement of business programs is coming to Walsh College in Troy as part of $15 million in renovations, additions and improvements.

The changes include a two-story, 27,000-square-foot renovation and addition to Walsh's original 1970s-era campus building and the redesign and modernization of 28,000 square feet of interior spaces on campus.

Construction will begin in late summer and is expected to be completed within 18 months. When finished, distinct pavilions will offer a business communication-focused student success center, a student lounge and a student services center.

The project will be guided by Valerio Dewalt Train Associates, the renovator of Walsh's Barry Center that opened in 2007.

The student success center will offer technologically advanced services and equipment meant to respond to the demand of employers and students for more business communication skills and leadership training.

Inside the center, students can work on presentations in various digital and electronic formats at new work stations, practice presentations and other projects in simulated workplace environments and have access to videoconferencing.

The new student lounge will have interactive meeting spaces and additional study areas and the new student services center will house all the departments of Walsh College, making taking care of college business faster and easier. There will also be more private meeting space for students and advisors.

Source: Lateshia Dowell, Airfoil PR
Writer: Kim North Shine

Brass Aluminum Forging embarks on $8.6M rehab of Ferndale brownfield

A vacant industrial site in Ferndale will be cleaned up and returned to the tax rolls after a growing local business renovates the property and brings new jobs to the site.

Brass Aluminum Forging's plan to re-use the building at 965 Wanda will come with an $8.6-million investment. The project got the go-ahead this week when the Michigan Economic Development Corp. approved a local and school tax capture of nearly $718,000, money that will help cover the cost of renovations.

The building will be shared by Brass Aluminum Forging and other tenants that lease space.

The company, which makes valve bodies, weapon components, air and hydraulic fittings, and architectural details and provides items that can be forged as well as other processes and products, expects to hire 50 new employees to work at the new site. Building tenants are expected to hire another 50 employees.

The city of Ferndale's Brownfield Development Authority requested the 965 Wanda site be a recipient of the the MEDC's Michigan Strategic Fund's economic development and community revitalization projects.

Source: Kathy Fagan, spokesperson, MEDC
Writer: Kim North Shine

Lawrence Tech breaks ground on residence hall at Southfield campus

An $11.6-million residence hall with room for 160 Lawrence Technological University students is expected to be ready for move-in by fall of 2015.

An April 7 groundbreaking marks the start of construction on a 47,545-square-foot, two-story building near the university's largest parking lot along the Northwestern Highway Service Drive.

The dorm will increase on-campus residential capacity by about one-third. Currently there are about 600 students living on campus. As the school's athletic programs and student activities grow, so too does the demand for housing on campus.

The new residence hall will be designed in a pod-style of five pods that sleep 32 students in 16 double-occupancy units. Each pod will have its own common lounge with fireplace and kitchen. All pods will share a cafe and retail space, laundry room, game room, multi-purpose and meeting rooms on the first floor.

“The building is designed to encourage students to be out of their rooms with plenty of space for interaction and collaboration," says LTU President Virinder Moudgil. "One of the goals is to get new students involved in campus life by fostering collegiality."

Source: Eric Pope, spokesperson, Lawrence Technological University
Writer: Kim North Shine

Roundabouts planned for Orchard Lake Road in Farmington Hills

The city of Farmington Hills is planning to redesign a mile-long stretch of Orchard Lake Road into a series of roundabouts and boulevards as a way to improve traffic safety, promote economic development and encourage bicycle and pedestrian travelers.

The reconstruction could start in the spring on the the busy stretch between 13 and 14 Mile roads. The five-lane Orchard Lake Road is a major entry into the city, and part of the larger Northwestern Connector Project of the Road Commission for Oakland County and the Michigan Department of Transportation. The purposes are to improve traffic safety, including reducing severity of traffic crashes by slowing traffic, to stimulate economic development and to promote ease of use for pedestrians and bicyclists.

Details of the plan will be presented at an April 23 meeting at Farmington Hills City Hall.

Source: City of Farmington Hills Engineering Division
Writer: Kim North Shine

Medical, retail next chapter for former Borders bookstore in Grosse Pointe

Work will start this spring on turning a roughly 20,000-square-foot former Borders bookstore in Grosse Pointe into a medical office and retail spaces.

The St. John Health System medical office will occupy one end of a nearly block-long building that's been vacant for many months since Ace Hardware, next door to the already-closed Borders, relocated to Mack Avenue.

The other end of the building, which fronts Kercheval Avenue in Grosse Pointe's Village business district, is likely to be occupied by a Calico Corners fabric and home store, if city approvals go through.

In the nearly three years since Borders closed and the year since Ace left, the property manager has said other retailers, including another hardware store and a national chain, would move in. That never materialized.

The big empty building became a further headache when city officials and St. John reps couldn't agree on re-development plans. In the end, St. John agreed to build medical offices on the back side of the building, which is connected to a city parking lot, and to rent space to three or four retailers on the front side of the building on Kercheval.

Peter Dame, Grosse Pointe city manager, says no retailers for the St. John's space have been named, but the proposed Calico Corners at the opposite end of the building would fill about 3,000 square feet. The rest of the space between the closed Ace and Borders will be divided into multiple retail outlets. He says that work will begin soon.

The St. John medical and retail project should be completed this summer, Dame says.

Source: Peter Dame, Grosse Pointe city manager
Writer: Kim North Shine

Mixed-use project to add to Auburn Hills downtown development plan

Auburn Hills' emerging downtown area will add a $10 million residential and commercial development to just over one acre at the southwest corner of Auburn and Squirrel roads.

Construction on Rivers Edge of Auburn Hills, a planned unit development, is to begin this summer and be completed by the summer of 2015.

Developer Burton-Katzman LLC won approval for  the project from the city council in early February, adding to a list of developments mostly related to the growing population of college students that has changed Auburn Hills in the last year. The developments include DEN, Downtown Education Nook; the University Center; the Auburn Square apartments and its retailers; and a 233-space parking structure.

Rivers Edge is expected to be a four-story building with 9,300 square feet of commercial space on the ground floor and 31 one- and two-bedroom apartments and lofts on the top three floors. About 50 parking spaces will be for residents, and another 11 will serve the commercial tenants and other downtown Auburn Hills visitors.

"We are pleased that Burton-Katzman is bringing this type of popular mixed-use, urban loft project to downtown Auburn Hills,” says Steve Cohen, director of community development for Auburn Hills. “Continued investment in the city is sparking strong interest from developers, prospective tenants and retailers."

Source: Barbara Fornasiero, EA Focus, Inc.
Writer: Kim North Shine

As campus life builds, new $11.6M dorm goes up at LTU

Construction on a third dorm at Lawrence Technological University in Southfield begins this spring, making room for the growing number of students coming for the education and the campus life.

The 47,545-square-foot, two-story building will house 160 students and face Lawrence Tech's largest parking lot. The building will also house university mechanical systems and storage in a 4,000-square-foot basement .

The $11.6-million project is an investment in students and in a changing university that is less of a commuter school as more fraternity life, varsity sports, student activities and other aspects of campus life are making on-campus living more attractive.

The new residence hall will be ready for move-in for the fall 2015 semester, and it will be arranged in five pods of 16 double-occupancy units. Each pod will have its own lounge, fireplace and kitchenette. There will be  dorm cafe and retail spaces as well as game rooms and meeting rooms and laundry facilities.

“The building is designed to encourage students to be out of their rooms with plenty of space for interaction and collaboration. One of the goals is to get new students involved in campus life by fostering collegiality on a regular basis,” LTU President Virinder Moudgil says.

Two residence halls, North, which opened in 1977, and South, which opened in 2002, have room for 600 students.

LTU was largely a commuter school until 1977, says spokesman Eric Pope, and it's slowly turned less so since. Students from 32 states and 46 countries attend LTU, and Michigan residents make up 66 percent of all students.

Source: Eric Pope, managing editor, University New Bureau, Lawrence Technological University
Writer: Kim North Shine

Crittenton Hospital adds high-tech tower to Rochester campus

Crittenton Hospital has expanded its hospital campus in Rochester Hills by adding a six-story tower where patient care will come with the latest in medical technology, treatment and education wrapped in a building that took a non-traditional, money-saving approach to construction.

The 165,000-square-foot South Tower on University Drive near Oakland University opened Wednesday, Jan. 8. It has 87 private patient rooms outfitted with smart beds that monitor patients' vital signs and activity without being hooked to electrodes.

The pharmacy in the new tower is operated by an automation system with bar code technologies that can help eliminate prescription errors.

The tower houses a cardiac center for medicine, where Crittenton doctors work in an open heart program partnership with the University of Michigan. Other floors are dedicated to family and primary care medicine as well as orthopaedic, joint and spine medicine and musculoskeletal disorders and injuries.

Education is incorporated in the new tower with innovative nursing stations that support training and clinical instruction to nursing students. Crittenton South Tower is also a learning center for Wayne State University School of Medicine's graduate residents.

A sanctuary for all religions and an outdoor garden meant to support emotional and spiritual well-being round out the new facility.

The $65-million tower also comes with an energy-efficient design that includes recycled materials. The construction project used an approach called Integrated Project Delivery. Hospital leaders and construction company reps from Barton Malow Company and Frank Rewold & Son say the approach, which re-evaluates and reworks traditional, costly construction not only saves health care costs but should be a model for other construction projects. They also say it is the largest such IDP project in Michigan.

Source: Brian Birney, director of marketing and communications, Crittenton Hospital and Adela Piper, Push22
Writer: Kim North Shine

Farmington DDA readies for downtown residential living

The Farmington Downtown Development Authority is taking on the role of property redeveloper with the goal of increasing residential living options  downtown.

The DDA is seeking a private developer via a request for proposal to build a second phase of condominiums at The Orchards condos on Slocum Drive just off downtown's main thoroughfare, Grand River, and Farmington Road.

The first phase of the mixed-residential project was completed in 2006, but after the housing market collapsed the second phase was never completed, says Annette Knowles, executive director of the Farmington DDA.

When the market began to bounce back, the DDA board decided to purchase the property to retain control over what would happen with it, she says. The DDA purchased the property for $95,000 in October.

“Introducing more development that is appealing to those seeking to reside in a downtown environment will help create a more robust economic base to support the business community," she says. "All signs indicate that development of this nature will again meet market demand."

The RFPs are due by March 7 and two inspections for prospective bidders are set for Jan. 13 and 15.

Source: Annette Knowles, executive director, Farmigton Downtown Development Authority
Writer: Kim North Shine

Ferndale gets new streetscape with extra bells and whistles

A six-month-long rebuild of West 9 Mile Road in downtown Ferndale is complete and showing off what it has to offer to people who drive, walk or bike the stretch of road that was redone in an effort to unify and promote the business district, create public art and gathering spaces, and update and maintain the city infrastructure.

The $1.8-million project paid for the replacement of 2,600 feet of outdated water main and also remade the roadway and sidewalks from Livernois to Pinecrest with a new streetscape.

The project, dubbed How the West was One, was paid for by the city of Ferndale, the Michigan Department of Transportation and the Ferndale Downtown Development Authority, which has long wanted the west part of 9 Mile to be more connected to the east side across Woodward Avenue.

You'll know the new western half by the bright yellow park benches, recycling bins, bike parking loops, new street lighting, plants, trees and shrubbery. In addition, the road was narrowed and designed with on-street parking, better crosswalks and bike lane arrows that give cyclists a designated, ideally safer place to ride.

In addition, the new Kenton Pocket Park was carved out of the project and while the construction was disruptive, a new business opened, as did a new public art gallery.

Source: Chris Hughes, spokesperson, Ferndale Downtown Development Authority
Writer: Kim North Shine

Age-friendly, plug-in ready neighborhood planned for Auburn Hills

A residential development in Auburn Hills is planned to be much more than another new subdivision.

The Parkways, a project of The Moceri Companies, is meant to create public use spaces, become an entry into the city's emerging downtown district, promote alternative electric vehicle usage and offer specially-designed multi-generational housing in one neighborhood.

City officials say the mix of housing styles and design of the neighborhood keep in mind the city's goals of offering more "age-friendly" and senior living options and promoting the inclusion of alternative energy technology in new construction.

The Parkways is also believed to be the largest residential development in Michigan to wire all property with electric vehicle plug-ins.

"This project was intentionally designed to meet Auburn Hills’ formal commitment to become an Age-Friendly Community with a variety of housing opportunities, parks, sidewalks and complete street considerations,” says Steven Cohen, director of community development for the city of Auburn Hills. “This private investment by The Moceri Companies to build a multi-generational development is a huge victory for the city.  It’s a game changer for Downtown Auburn Hills.”

As for electric vehicle wiring, Cohen says, "If considered when a project is first built, preparing for electric vehicles is very easy and inexpensive.  By prepping these garages with proper wiring, new residents within this development will only need to add a charging station on the wall if they buy or lease an electric vehicle.  It’s like adding a garage door opener and the costs are now very similar.  Having proper infrastructure in place will help this technology succeed. It just takes forward thinking.”

The Parkways will be made up of 76 townhouse, 72 stacked, flat units and a three-story 160-unit senior care complex.

The market value of The Parkways, which will be built on 21.5 acres of property west of Adams road and north of the Clinton River Trail, is expected to be $75 million. Previous plans for a major housing development by another company foundered during the recession, and the property went into foreclosure and then back into the city's hands.

A partnership with the city and Moceri means part of the land will become a two-acre public park and the major road through the property will be designed as a boulevard an eastern gateway into downtown Auburn Hills, where major projects such as student housing, will be completed soon.

Construction on the first of five phases is scheduled to being in the spring of 2014 and be completed by the end of 2017.

Source: City of Auburn Hills
Writer: Kim North Shine

Veterans' housing foundation opens HQ in downtown Mount Clemens

An organization formed to prevent homelessness among veterans has opened an office in downtown Mount Clemens as it makes plans to become a Midwest advocate for military men, women and families

VCCF, Veterans Construction Communities Foundation,
offers housing assistance, whether it's building, remodeling or financial assistance, job training and lacemtn and other services that help veterans of all wars and their families not only assimilate post war but thrive and have a high quality of life, says Mark Diaz, VCCF founder and president. Diaz is also a  Marine and veteran of Vietnam and Desert Storm, a former Detroit Police Department detective and founder and executive vice president of Liberty Home Loans.

Diaz founded VCCF with Mary Beth Ryan, who has a background as a sales and marketing executive in radio and TV and is a fundraiser for some of metro Detroit's well-known events. Their connections and experience put them in a place to network with people and companies who can help veterans.

The foundation's new office opens Oct. 24 at 15 North Walnut, not far from the Macomb County Courthouse. The founders say they want to share with the Veterans Administration the overwhelming burden of needs of veterans trying to return to normalcy. Some 1.5 million veterans are at imminent risk of homelessness, says VCCF's founders.

Besides offering general assistance to veterans and their families, VCCF is project-based. Money will be raised, volunteers gathered and expertise and connections tapped for specific veterans.

The current project is the rehabilitation of the Mount Clemens home of an U.S. Army sergeant whose bank account was emptied and who had the ownership of his homes illegally transferred while he was on his third tour of duty in Iraq.

The goal of VCCF with its motto, One Soldier, One Home, One At A Time, is to "be a significant force in eradicating and prevention of veteran homelessness. The funds we raise through the foundation will supply housing options for veterans and their families," Diaz says. “Our vision is to also become the Midwest resource and advocacy center for the veteran population.”

Source: Mark Diaz and Mary Beth Ryan, founders, Veterans Constructing Communities Foundation
Writer: Kim North Shine


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